Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
Taal Volcano Bulletin 19 June 2013 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Wednesday, 19 June 2013 07:42

Taal Volcano’s (14.0000°N, 120.9833°E) seismic network recorded one (1) volcanic earthquake during the past 24-hour observation period. Field measurements last 13 June 2013 at the western sector of the Main Crater Lake yielded a slight decrease in water temperature of 32.5°C from 33.2°C, increase in water level of 0.25 meter from 0.24 meter, and water acidity remained at pH 3.03.  Ground deformation survey in the Volcano Island on 23 May-01 June 2013 denoted slight deflation at Calauit, Alas-as, Pira-piraso, Daang Kastila and New Eruption Site precise leveling lines compared to the February 2013 survey.  However, GPS data for the period of October 2012 to first week of May 2013 show inflationary changes in ground deformation while the edifice is still slightly inflating in general compared to February 2011 baseline data. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission at the Main Crater Lake increased to 947 tonnes per day on 03 March 2013 compared to 720 tonnes per day last 27 November 2012.

Alert Level 1 remains in effect over Taal Volcano. This means that hazardous eruption is not imminent. The public, however, is reminded that the Main Crater should be strictly off-limits because sudden steam explosions may occur and high concentrations of toxic gases may accumulate. The northern portion of the Main Crater rim, in the vicinity of Daang Kastila Trail, may also become hazardous when steam emission along existing fissures suddenly increases.  Furthermore, the public is also reminded that the entire Volcano Island is a Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ), and permanent settlement in the island is strongly not recommended.

DOST-PHIVOLCS

 
BULUSAN VOLCANO BULLETIN 29 April 2017 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Saturday, 29 April 2017 07:10

Bulusan Volcano’s seismic monitoring network recorded one (1) volcanic earthquake during the past 24 hours.  Weak emission of white steam plumes that rose up to 70 meters and drifted southeast was observed coming from the active vents. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission was measured at an average of 11 tonnes per day on March 17, 2017. Precise leveling data obtained on January 29, 2017 - February 03, 2017 indicated deflationary changes since October 2016. This is consistent with data from continuous GPS measurements that indicated short-term deflation of the edifice since January 2017. However, the edifice remains generally inflated with respect to July 2016 based on continuous GPS data.

Alert Level 1 (abnormal) status remains in effect over Bulusan Volcano, which means that it is currently in a state of unrest probably driven by hydrothermal processes that could generate steam driven or phreatic eruptions. Local government units and the public are reminded that entry into the 4-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) is strictly prohibited and that vigilance in the Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) must be exercised due to the increased possibilities of sudden and hazardous phreatic eruptions. Civil aviation authorities must also advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ash from any sudden phreatic eruption can be hazardous to aircraft. Furthermore, people living within valleys and along river/stream channels especially on the southeast, southwest and northwest sector of the edifice should be vigilant against sediment-laden stream flows and lahars in the event of heavy and prolonged rainfall. DOST-PHIVOLCS is closely monitoring Bulusan Volcano’s condition and any new development will be communicated to all concerned stakeholders.

DOST-PHIVOLCS

 
KANLAON VOLCANO BULLETIN (UPDATED) 24 February 2018 10:00 A.M. PDF Print
Saturday, 24 February 2018 10:13

Kanlaon Volcano's seismic monitoring network recorded one (1) volcanic earthquake during the past 24 hours. Weak to moderate emission of white steam-laden plumes that rose 200 meters from the summit before drifting southwest was observed during times when the crater was visible. Ground deformation data from continuous GPS measurements indicate a more pronounced inflation of the edifice since December 2015, signifying pressurization deep beneath the edifice. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission was measured at an average of 260 tonnes/day on 23 February 2018.

Alert Level 2 status prevails over Kanlaon Volcano, which means that the volcano is undergoing a moderate level of unrest due to probable intrusion of magma at depth that may or may not lead to a magmatic eruption. The local government units and the public are strictly reminded that entry into the 4-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) is strictly prohibited due to the further possibilities of sudden and hazardous steam-driven or phreatic eruptions. Civil aviation authorities must also advise pilots to avoid flying close to the volcano’s summit as ejecta from any sudden phreatic eruption can be hazardous to aircraft. DOST-PHIVOLCS is closely monitoring Kanlaon Volcano’s activity and any new development will be relayed to all concerned.

DOST-PHIVOLCS

 
PHIVOLCS Researchers Joins the First AOGS-EGU Joint Conference PDF Print
Monday, 12 February 2018 16:54

Twenty-two researchers from the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) joined the first Asia Oceana Geosciences Society and European Geosciences Union’s Joint Conference held at Taal Vista Hotel, Tagaytay on February 5-8, 2018. A total of 23 research studies was presented through oral and poster parallel sessions with themes “Black Swan and Grey Swan events”, “Natural Hazards in the Megacity”, “Natural hazard communications, warning and Monitoring”, and “Single Hazard Case Studies”. Among the research studies presented are the results of the assessments of the 10 February 2017 Surigao Earthquake and 06 July 2017 Leyte Earthquake, Landslide Warning and Monitoring developments, Volcano Monitoring parameters and updates, and the newly released Philippine Earthquake Model.

The conference, with the theme “New Dimension for Natural Hazards in Asia”, was attended by 155 foreign researchers from Asia, Europe and America, and 58 local researchers. The conference was not just limited to research presentations, but also includes panel and breakout discussions. Among the topics discussed in the panel discussions are Space-Based Technologies, Science and Insurance, Stochastic, deterministic and heuristic approaches to natural hazards, and Civil Defense and Geological Disaster in the Philippine Perspective. The breakout discussions on the other hand, focused on science research ethics after the disaster, hazards mitigation, warning-systems, and policy-making, and challenges in natural hazards research.

Aside from the presentations, PHIVOLCS also led the Taal Volcano Fieldtrip on February 5, which includes trips at the Taal Volcano Observatory and Taal Volcano Main Crater Lake.

Volcano Monitoring and Eruption Prediction Division (WMEPD) Chief Mariton V. Bornas tours foreign AOGS participants at the Taal Volcano Observatory (TVO).

Volcano Monitoring and Eruption Prediction Division (WMEPD) Chief Mariton V. Bornas tours foreign AOGS participants at the Taal Volcano Observatory (TVO).

 

PHIVOLCS researchers explain the result of their studies through oral presentations.

PHIVOLCS researchers explain the result of their studies through oral presentations.

 

(Clockwise from Upper Right) Dr. Teresito Bacolcol, Dr. Arturo Daag, Dr. Ma. Leonila Bautista, and Dr. Paul Alanis discusses with other participants the result of their research.

(Clockwise from Upper Right) Dr. Teresito Bacolcol, Dr. Arturo Daag, Dr. Ma. Leonila Bautista, and Dr. Paul Alanis discusses with other participants the result of their research

 

(Clockwise from upper left) Ms. Ma. Isabel Abigania, Ms. Kathleen Papiona, Ms. Jayvie Nadua, Ms. Analyn Aquino, and Ms. Margarita Dizon, explains the results of the investigations done on the subsequent earthquakes of 2017, as well as the improvement on PHIVOLCS mapping systems.

(Clockwise from upper left) Ms. Ma. Isabel Abigania, Ms. Kathleen Papiona, Ms. Jayvie Nadua, Ms. Analyn Aquino, and Ms. Margarita Dizon, explains the results of the investigations done on the subsequent earthquakes of 2017, as well as the improvement on PHIVOLCS mapping systems.

 

  Junior researchers from PHIVOLCS (from upper left: Deo Carlo Llamas, Kimberley Vitto, Concepcion Barairo, Daniel Buhay and Robelyn Mangahas) enthusiastically present their studies to other researches during their first AOGS conference.

Junior researchers from PHIVOLCS (from upper left: Deo Carlo Llamas, Kimberley Vitto, Concepcion Barairo, Daniel Buhay and Robelyn Mangahas) enthusiastically present their studies to other researches during their first AOGS conference.

 

Improvements on warning, monitoring, and mapping of deep-seated landslides under the DOST Dynaslope Project was explained by (from upper left) Earl Anthony Mendoza, Brian Anthony Gumiran, and Nathan Azriel Veracruz.

Improvements on warning, monitoring, and mapping of deep-seated landslides under the DOST Dynaslope Project was explained by (from upper left) Earl Anthony Mendoza, Brian Anthony Gumiran, and Nathan Azriel Veracruz.

 

Dr. Ma. Leonila P. Bautista joins the panel in the discussion of “Civil Defense and Geological Disasters: the Philippine Perspective”.

Dr. Ma. Leonila P. Bautista joins the panel in the discussion of “Civil Defense and Geological Disasters: the Philippine Perspective”.

 
MAYON VOLCANO BULLETIN 19 June 2013 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Wednesday, 19 June 2013 07:43

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2500°N, 123.6833°E) seismic network did not detect any volcanic earthquake during the past 24-hour observation period. Steaming activity was not observed due to thick clouds covering the summit crater. No crater glow was observed last night. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission on 14 June 2013 was measured at an average of 133 tonnes/day. Ground deformation survey (precise levelling) on the third week of May 2013 showed slight inflation of the edifice compared to February 2012, with the volcano still slightly inflated compared to January 2010 baselines.

Mayon Volcano’s alert status remains at Alert Level 1, which means that it is at abnormal condition.  Although this means that presently no magmatic eruption is imminent, it is strongly advised that the public refrain from entering the 6-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) due to the perennial life-threatening dangers of rockfalls, landslides/avalanches at the middle to upper slope, sudden ash puffs and steam-driven or phreatic eruptions from the summit. Active stream/river channels and those identified as perennially lahar-prone areas on all sectors of the volcano should also be avoided especially during extreme weather conditions when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. DOST-PHIVOLCS maintains its close monitoring of Mayon Volcano and any new development will be communicated to all concerned stakeholders.

DOST-PHIVOLCS

 
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