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Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
Taal Volcano Bulletin 19 June 2013 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Tuesday, 18 June 2013 23:42

Taal Volcano’s (14.0000°N, 120.9833°E) seismic network recorded one (1) volcanic earthquake during the past 24-hour observation period. Field measurements last 13 June 2013 at the western sector of the Main Crater Lake yielded a slight decrease in water temperature of 32.5°C from 33.2°C, increase in water level of 0.25 meter from 0.24 meter, and water acidity remained at pH 3.03.  Ground deformation survey in the Volcano Island on 23 May-01 June 2013 denoted slight deflation at Calauit, Alas-as, Pira-piraso, Daang Kastila and New Eruption Site precise leveling lines compared to the February 2013 survey.  However, GPS data for the period of October 2012 to first week of May 2013 show inflationary changes in ground deformation while the edifice is still slightly inflating in general compared to February 2011 baseline data. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission at the Main Crater Lake increased to 947 tonnes per day on 03 March 2013 compared to 720 tonnes per day last 27 November 2012.

Alert Level 1 remains in effect over Taal Volcano. This means that hazardous eruption is not imminent. The public, however, is reminded that the Main Crater should be strictly off-limits because sudden steam explosions may occur and high concentrations of toxic gases may accumulate. The northern portion of the Main Crater rim, in the vicinity of Daang Kastila Trail, may also become hazardous when steam emission along existing fissures suddenly increases.  Furthermore, the public is also reminded that the entire Volcano Island is a Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ), and permanent settlement in the island is strongly not recommended.

DOST-PHIVOLCS

 
MAYON VOLCANO BULLETIN 11 December 2013 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Tuesday, 10 December 2013 23:08

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2500°N, 123.6833°E) seismic network did not detect any volcanic earthquake during the past 24-hour observation period. Moderate emission of white steam plumes drifting west-southwest was observed. No crater glow was observed last night. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission on 23 November 2013 was measured at an average of 211 tonnes/day. Ground deformation survey (precise leveling) on the 2nd week of November 2013 showed slight deflation of the edifice compared to August 2013 survey, with the volcano still slightly inflated compared to January 2010 baselines.

Mayon Volcano’s alert status remains at Alert Level 1, which means that it is at abnormal condition. Although this means that presently no magmatic eruption is imminent, it is strongly advised that the public refrain from entering the 6-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) due to the perennial life-threatening dangers of rockfalls, landslides/avalanches at the middle to upper slope, sudden ash puffs and steam-driven or phreatic eruptions from the summit. Active stream/river channels and those identified as perennially lahar-prone areas on all sectors of the volcano should also be avoided especially during extreme weather conditions when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. DOST-PHIVOLCS maintains its close monitoring of Mayon Volcano and any new development will be communicated to all concerned stakeholders.

 
MAYON VOLCANO BULLETIN 28 July 2014 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Sunday, 27 July 2014 22:36

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2500°N, 123.6833°E) seismic network did not detect any volcanic earthquake during the past 24-hour observation period. Rain clouds covered the summit preventing visual observation. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) flux was measured at an average of 397 tonnes/day on 10 July 2014. Ground deformation measurements from precise leveling surveys on the 2nd week of June 2014 showed inflationary changes in the edifice from February 2014. Tilt data shows that the edifice is still inflated compared to January 2012 baselines.

Mayon Volcano’s alert status remains at Alert Level 1, which means that it is at abnormal condition. Although this means that presently no magmatic eruption is imminent, it is strongly advised that the public refrain from entering the 6-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) due to the perennial life-threatening dangers of rockfalls, landslides/avalanches at the middle to upper slope, sudden ash puffs and steam-driven or phreatic eruptions from the summit. Active stream/river channels and those identified as perennially lahar-prone areas on all sectors of the volcano should also be avoided especially during extreme weather conditions when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. DOST-PHIVOLCS maintains its close monitoring of Mayon Volcano and any new development will be communicated to all concerned stakeholders.

 
PHIVOLCS and Province of Albay Commemorate 200-years of 1814 Mayon Volcano Eruption, 26-77 June 2014, Legaspi, Albay PDF Print
Friday, 18 July 2014 07:08

Legaspi, Albay. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) in partnership with the Province of Albay commemorated the 200-years anniversary of the 1814 Mayon Volcano Eruption on 26-27 June at the La Piazza Hotel, Legaspi, Albay.

Eruptions from Mayon Volcano that people remember date back to 1968, 1978, 1984, 1993, 2000-2001, 2006 and 2009. What most people are probably not aware of is that, two hundred years ago, on 01 February 1814, Mayon Volcano gave one of its biggest, most destructive eruptions. This event affected the southern slope of the volcano, specifically Camalig, Cagsaua, Budiao and Guinobatan and resulted to 1,200 casualties. The ruins of Cagsaua Church wherein only the bell tower remains standing is a reminder and testimony of this disaster.

The 2-day conference was held to provide venue to hold a meeting of experts from different fields to share knowledge and experience. To have a science, historical and social perspectives, invited presentations ·had topics ranging from understanding Mayon’s eruptive history, status of volcano monitoring ·and practices in ·disaster risk reduction and management in the local government levels. ·What is more important is to be able to use these knowledge and prepare for possible eruptions that may be bigger than what have been experienced in the last 60 years. To familiarize the participants with hazards of eruptions and monitoring being done on the volcano and the preparedness by the local government, a whole-day field visit at several significant sites was organized. Some of the sites visited were: ·PHIVOLCS Lignon Hill Observatory, 1814 deposit at Mabinit Channel, the Muon Telescope installed at the Mayon Resthouse Observatory and the evacuation center in Santo Domingo.

The conference was attended by representatives from PHIVOLCS led by Director Renato U. Solidum, Jr., and from the different local government ·units around Mayon Volcano led by Honorable Gov Joey Salceda.

Participants learn about the volcano monitoring system at PHIVOLCS Mayon Lignon Hill Observstory. PHIVOLCS Director Renato U. Solidum, Jr discusses the IPCam installed at Mayon-Lignon HIll Observatory to be able to monitor the volcano activity in real-time even at the Quezon City office.
Group Photo: Participants of the 200 Year Commemoration of the 1814 Mayon VOlcano Eruption. Participants were introduced to the 1814 deposit (behind)
The Muon Telescope installed at the Mayon Resthouse Observatory. Participants visit the Mayon Resthouse Observatory.
 
MAYON VOLCANO BULLETIN 19 June 2013 8:00 A.M. PDF Print
Tuesday, 18 June 2013 23:43

Mayon Volcano’s (13.2500°N, 123.6833°E) seismic network did not detect any volcanic earthquake during the past 24-hour observation period. Steaming activity was not observed due to thick clouds covering the summit crater. No crater glow was observed last night. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission on 14 June 2013 was measured at an average of 133 tonnes/day. Ground deformation survey (precise levelling) on the third week of May 2013 showed slight inflation of the edifice compared to February 2012, with the volcano still slightly inflated compared to January 2010 baselines.

Mayon Volcano’s alert status remains at Alert Level 1, which means that it is at abnormal condition.  Although this means that presently no magmatic eruption is imminent, it is strongly advised that the public refrain from entering the 6-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) due to the perennial life-threatening dangers of rockfalls, landslides/avalanches at the middle to upper slope, sudden ash puffs and steam-driven or phreatic eruptions from the summit. Active stream/river channels and those identified as perennially lahar-prone areas on all sectors of the volcano should also be avoided especially during extreme weather conditions when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. DOST-PHIVOLCS maintains its close monitoring of Mayon Volcano and any new development will be communicated to all concerned stakeholders.

DOST-PHIVOLCS

 
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